The Healthy Celiac Podcast

Living with Celiac Disease for 50+ Years - Interview with Lisa Mills

June 06, 2022 Belinda Whelan, Lisa Mills Season 1 Episode 61
The Healthy Celiac Podcast
Living with Celiac Disease for 50+ Years - Interview with Lisa Mills
Show Notes Transcript

Today's guest was diagnosed with Celiac Disease in the 1960's. On this episode we chat about her journey, challenges along the way and why she has become more strict with her eating in the past 10 years.

Learn more about Ultimate Celiac System here https://belindawhelan.teachable.com/p/ultimate-celiac-system

Join my free community and grab your copy of 11 Mistakes People Make Living Gluten Free here https://view.flodesk.com/pages/5fd89e87c5e1bc4d3cc5e302


And I would love to connect with you on Instagram thehealthyceliac

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Music Credit bensound.com 

Speaker 1:

All right . Welcome back to this week's episode of the healthy celiac podcast. I'm so excited to have a wonderful guest on the show today. Lisa Milles , who I actually grew up knowing, and she's been living with celiac disease for over 50 years now. So I'm very excited to have her on the show and talk to us about her experience. So thank you, Lisa. Welcome.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, E I was just like over 50 years. Oh my gosh . <laugh> that's a long time 50 . I know . I'm 57 . So I , um, yeah, I've, I've been living with , with celiac disease since I was born. Wow. Um , yeah . Yeah. I was diagnosed at well diagnosed at 18 months old. So mm-hmm , <affirmative> that would've been around about 1960 . I'm gonna go 66 . I was born in 64 , so it would've been around 1966 , so,

Speaker 1:

Wow. Yeah , just incredible. Like to think that there's so many people now in 2022, as we are recording this, that struggle for years and years to get a diagnosis and way back then you were able to get a diagnosis. So what, what was the reason that your parents thought that, you know, they needed to check you out? What were your symptoms? What were you struggling from? Lisa?

Speaker 2:

I think it was my grandmother, I think . Well, it was my grandmother cuz I remember her saying like I was just one of the , I was just always crying. Like I was all and like never, I looked like, you know, like a very malnourished child. I had the big belly. Yes. You know? And um, I , so because obviously as we know, we , you know, celiac says you're not getting all the nourishment outta the food if you're not eating the right food. But , um, so, and I was just crying all the time and very sickly mm-hmm <affirmative> and I think it was around about when I was 18 months old. My , my grandmother tells me the story that like she had just, she'd been, they'd been taking me to the doctors , like mom had been taking me to the doctors and it was like, we don't know , we don't know . And I think my grandmother, she just sort of went , um, and it was to the hospital back in the days. Cause there wasn't, you know, a doctor on every corner , um , back in the, you know , mid sixties. But uh , she basically said to the doctors, if you don't find out what's wrong with this kid, I'm gonna leave her with you. <laugh>

Speaker 1:

Give him the old ultimatum go grandma .

Speaker 2:

I know. Right. So yeah, I know. So , um, thank goodness for, you know , um, powerful women, right? Yeah . Back in the sixties who were strong enough to stand up to the doctors and I was diagnosed , um , with celiac disease. Yeah . But back then it was not the , it was almost like take her home, feed her rice and she will get better .

Speaker 1:

Okay . Mm . Okay.

Speaker 2:

So that's what they did.

Speaker 1:

Yep . So not much

Speaker 2:

Carbon , even rice forever

Speaker 1:

<laugh> yeah, no that's right, exactly. <laugh> so they, they were able to pinpoint pretty quickly that it was celiac disease or did they have

Speaker 2:

To yeah .

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Wow. That's amazing. Really

Speaker 2:

Isn't no , from all, from all accounts. I mean, like I said, I know my , we had been back and to the doctors . Yeah . Um , and so I guess at some point it was, you know, diagnosis by , um, ruling out all the other things. Yes . But you know , um, yeah, it was 18 months old and it was celiac disease and they said, you know , take her home, give her rice and ice cream , but I don't even think ice cream back then was really gluten free . But anyway , um , I don't think there was, you know , no talk of , um, gluten-free diets, but then, you know, in all fairness, back in the sixties, it , there wasn't a lot of gluten-free food around. No , I'm guessing, oh , question

Speaker 1:

Today . Even in the last 10 years I've seen such an improvement. So I can only imagine what it was like for your mom back then. Such a

Speaker 2:

Challenge. Yeah. Yeah . Wow . Yeah. Far out . So we never really stuck to the gluten-free diet though. Um, and I guess that was the thing once, you know , uh , I , I was , um , cured because I'd been eating, you know, rice and , um, and of course I was, you know , uh , um, getting stronger and, you know, not crying as much and sort of growing and developing over time. Um , just went on to eat normal or I shouldn't say normal, but you know, food that had gluten in it. Oh, did you? And um, wow . I was always skinny. Yeah . Always skinny. And you know, back in the day it was like, oh , I'm always skinny, but I was skinny for the wrong reason. So, you know, yeah . Um , I was not healthy and to be, and it probably took until I had my first son, which was in 1999 . Um, I had had a , um, before, so , uh , Danny was born in 1989 . I had had a , a colonoscopy , um, you know, not a colonoscopy, a gastro yeah . Colonoscopy back in , um, before that, that diagnosed me with CX disease. Okay . Um , but still again, there wasn't a lot of , um, gluten free food around. So you were really relying on , um, you know, reading labels and that, and I wasn't very good at that. When I had Daniel, I was super, super, super tired all the time, like super tired . And I knew being a new mom was, you know, gonna make you tired and was , you know, a different thing. But yeah . Um, I ended up going back to the doctors and saying, look, I get it. Having a new child is, you know, can be, you know , quite exhausting, but there's something else going on. And in fact, the , the doctor I went to , she was really quite rude when I reflect on it . Um , she , yeah , she was just like , oh , get over . It you'll be right . It's just, you know , being a new mom . Oh .

Speaker 1:

Had the exact same experience .

Speaker 2:

Right . Yeah .

Speaker 1:

Yep . Mm .

Speaker 2:

So it turns out though I did go back and I, I went to a , um , went and saw again a , um, a specialist and got, got rediagnosed, I guess, with celiacs and then tried to live a more , um, gluten free lifestyle. Yeah . But incredibly hard even back in the, you know, nineties incredibly hard.

Speaker 1:

Yeah , definitely. So have you found that it's got easier since then? Like it's been a , a different journey for you since finding out, I guess for the second time and, and knowing better.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Look, it , you know, it is much easier now , uh , there, the , the array of food that's available , um, is mind blowing . Yeah . And , um, you know, even the better labeling on foods, all those things make a difference. And I think, you know, I'm, I'm , I'm pretty fortunate in the sense that so, you know, having celiac disease is you have celiac disease. Yeah . And it's no good, you know, eating any amount of gluten is no good for you . Um , but having said that, I know that if I do , um , eat some gluten, I don't get as , as a severe reaction as some other people get. So , um, you know, I guess over the, you know, sort of through the nineties and , and over the last probably 20 years or so , um, I , I certainly not a doctor I've probably tolerated , um, feeling unwell. Yeah . More often. Um, but now it's like probably the last, I'd say the last five years, it's just an absolute, you know, there is no room for, and probably the last 10 years, to be honest, absolutely. No room for gluten in my world anymore. Yeah. Good. And I'm very, very strict. Yeah. And it is easier and it's easier to go out and eat. Although I still find some restaurants are really, you know, not , um, uh , celiac friendly. Yeah . Um, absolutely . And that's, that's an issue mm-hmm <affirmative> and even if you ask it's like, I went to a restaurant, I won't say where I was, but I did go to a restaurant. Yeah . And I did say , and I was having breakfast actually. And I did say , um , you know , can I have , you know , eggs on gluten free toast? Oh , you're a little pet, aren't you ? Your little softy. I know. I was like, it was an older woman, so I was sort of , you know , I was like, oh , you know , I was very kind and gracious, but there still is that around that , um , yes . It still happens . I find that you still get looked at quite weirdly. And in fact, even on a , um , a TV show, I was watching a TV show the other day , um , a cooking show and the , the cook or the chef , I'm not sure which one he was, but he actually even said , you know , celiac disease , gluten intolerance , same thing . I'm with this much ,

Speaker 1:

There's a lot of misinformation out there. And a lot of people don't know . And yeah, it's very important for us to educate and share what we know with people. Definitely. But like you say, it's got easier and you will find those dodgy restaurants and places, but there's so many more that are very accommodating and go above and beyond that

Speaker 2:

Specific . Oh , absolutely. Yeah . Yeah . Those ones where they actually ask you, do you have celiac disease ? Yes . I love that . And then, you know, that they're actually gonna go and do, you know , cook your food in all the right ways. Exactly. Yeah. Right. And, and that , that makes me, you know, feel confident because I , sometimes I do walk outta places and I'm like, yep . Not sure that was gluten and free , to be honest. And you trusting, we are trusting that people are doing the right thing ,

Speaker 1:

Our health aren't we, so,

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah , absolutely. Yep .

Speaker 2:

It's amazing . Yeah .

Speaker 1:

So I know that you travel a lot, Lisa. Um , I follow you on Instagram and I see that you're always off going to different places, more so probably pre COVID . But again, I said , you've been traveling a fair bit and you're coming down to Adelaide recently more often. Um, so how, how would you sort of, I guess , um, what , what would you say are your top tips for traveling with celiac disease? Because I know a lot of people are scared of traveling because it's, I guess it's outside of their comfort zone. They don't know where to eat. They don't know, you know , what to do to keep safe. So what would you say are your top tips?

Speaker 2:

Yeah . Well, I always Google, so I use Google to find my information around the different restaurants and the places we are going . I also know that, you know , some place it's going be far harder . Yeah . Um , to find gluten free and, you know, then in other places, but Google, the restaurants you're going to. Yep . And I always, you know, what years ago, I always felt embarrassed to say that I had CX disease. I dunno why, but I just did. I felt embarrassed. Okay . Um , but now I walk in and it's like, I have CX disease. Do you have a gluten free ? You know? And, and talk to me about it, tell me what it is and you know, what I find that most places that we have been to, even to Disneyland. So in 2019 , I mean, we've been to Disneyland a couple of times, 2019 went to Disneyland. Yeah . And , um, you know, there are a number of the little, you know, food places that will actually , um , cater for people with celiac disease. Yeah . But you have to tell them yeah. Yeah . So, and if you tell them they will , like the , the cook will come out or the chef will come out and they'll talk you through, you know what they've got. So, yeah. Number one, tip is Google the restaurants first, just to see if they at least have a gluten free menu. And then when you get there, actually talk to them about it. Yeah . And don't be afraid to walk out if absolutely the food that they serve is not going to be good for you. Yeah . So, you know, and explain that, you know, thanks very much. And I have done that a few times where I've just said, look , your menu sounds amazing. But unfortunately, because I have celiac disease, you know, I'm not gonna be able to eat here. So, you know, and we , we go out , so yeah.

Speaker 1:

What about on planes? How have you found that experience?

Speaker 2:

You know what , uh , it's funny. I , um, I think pre COVID , um, you know, you could ring up , uh , the airline and you could say, you know , um , I'm Lisa, this is my seat number and I have, you know, celiac disease and , um , they were pretty good. Um , you know, they would, they would cater for you. I haven't found that so much , um , post COVID in the , the bit of traveling I've done. Yeah. They , and look, I get it. Airlines are trying to get back up and running and, you know, there there's all sorts of things going on for them . Yeah . Um, but I definitely still will ring them. Sometimes they will tell you straight up that they won't be able to get a gluten-free meal on the plane mm-hmm <affirmative> but they will have snacks. Yeah . And right now I have , you know, I've mainly been traveling between, you know, I'm from the gold coast, so gold coast, Adelaide. So, you know yeah . A two hour flight, two and a half flight. I can't go without food for two and a half hours. I'm in trouble. Yeah . <laugh> but most of them will have gluten free snacks. Yeah . So, you know, the gluten free chips or gluten free , like, you know, as long as you don't mind a bit of, you know , good old junk food , um , they'll have the , do it sometimes don't biscuits and that I know . Right . So , um , I , well , but you know what, and not that I want to , it's not about complaining, but it is about giving feedback and saying, Hey , you know, I , I get it, but I'm probably not the only one flying on your airline who actually, you know, has CX disease or, you know, even for people who are gluten intolerant that's right. Um , so you need to do better. Yeah . Like they need to do better. So you do pay good money

Speaker 1:

To

Speaker 2:

The airline. Absolutely. Yeah . Beautiful. Absolutely. Yeah . So , um , and I think that's important. Yeah. I think it's really important even to restaurants, you know, even if they're not displaying , um , you know, a lot of restaurants you go into they'll have on their menu, they'll have whether it's gluten free or, you know, vegetarian or whatever, if they don't, I actually say to them, it would be really helpful if you could display on the menu . Yeah . So it , it makes it cause like I said, I've now, and it's taken me a long time to get the confidence to go hang on. I'm, you know, got CEL disease and I need something. Whereas I know people, some people won't yeah . They'll actually put their health at risk. Yes. Just to stay in a restaurant and eat the food that they think is gluten free . So yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yep . I agree. Definitely. Yeah . I love the labeling. The labeling is huge. Massive help.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Right. And you know what, when you find a good restaurant as well, let them know. Yep . Let them know and share that as well. Yeah , definitely. Yeah . That's as important as

Speaker 1:

It makes them want look after us then as well. I think that is a , a great,

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. Yeah . Yeah. We've got a little Thai restaurant around the corner from us. We go there all the time. Yeah . Um , and they know that I'm gluten free and that , you know, I know what's on their menu that is gluten free , which is for Thai food. Most of it. Yeah. Um , but you know, it's the sources in that that they use. So once they know you're gluten free , they use the different sources. So, you know yeah. That's important. Tell people,

Speaker 1:

Yeah , I agree. Biggest thing you can do for your health that's for sure.

Speaker 2:

Do you know? Sorry . Do you know what even, sorry, just, I was gonna say, even in the workplace , um, you know, for, you know, morning teas or whatever, mm-hmm <affirmative> again, I just, I never used to bother. I go , I don't , you know, now I'm alright , but you know what? Now, when I go into a workplace, I'm like , you know what , I'm gluten free . And if we're gonna have a morning tea or whatever, you know, lunch, whatever, then there needs to be options for not only me, but for others as well. So yeah.

Speaker 1:

And, and you're right. It's , it's not always just us. It's very common now to come across another person that needs to eat gluten free when you're at an event or you're out. So yeah. It is looking for other people that won't speak up for themselves. So that's fantastic to hear.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely, absolutely.

Speaker 1:

Now I did put it out to my community if they had any questions for you, Lisa. So I had a couple of ladies respond. So one of them , um , is Anne Campanella . I interviewed her recently on the podcast. She's written a memoir called celiac mom , and she sent her a couple of questions. So the first one that she had was how have things changed over time? So we touched on this a little bit, but what would you say has been the biggest thing, I guess that's changed over the time since well, it's, it's basically your whole life, isn't it? It's from the beginning, you noticed things have changed.

Speaker 2:

Look definitely the availability of gluten free food, which can I say is a good thing, but is not such a good thing either because I used to avoid cakes and everything , but now , so it's like , oh , there's the gluten free . So I think the availability of food. Yeah . Um, and I think that's important. Not , and not so much for me. And look, I , I'm not someone who goes home and cooks. Like I am not that person that'll go and cook something gluten free . Yeah . Um , I like to be able to go buy something can know that it's safe.

Speaker 1:

Yep . Yep . Beautiful. So make mostly

Speaker 2:

Availability.

Speaker 1:

Yeah . Good answer. All right . And the other question she had was what are your best tips for staying healthy?

Speaker 2:

Well, obviously for me and for anyone who has celiac disease is to avoid gluten altogether mm-hmm <affirmative> . Um, but I also, you know, I'm, I haven't delved into it , um, a lot, but you know, just generally keeping our immune system healthy mm-hmm <affirmative> um , you know, because celiac celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. And generally along with that come other autoimmune diseases as well, particularly for women as we get older. Um , but I think, you know, getting out, doing some form of movement, you know, whether it's walking, but getting outside, getting some beautiful, fresh air, keeping hydrated, eating, you know, like I said, the availability of food is great, but the downside has been, I am eating more cakes and rubbish <laugh> um , but trying to stay away from all the processed food anyway, and trying to eat fresh where possible. And, you know, I think when we've all heard the , you know, the tip , um, you know, stay to the outside of the supermarkets, go around the edges, don't go down those middle aisles. Cause that's, for all the nasties are , even if they're gluten free , there's still no good

Speaker 1:

For you . Yeah . That's it . The junk .

Speaker 2:

So yeah . So just exercise, you know what, and just having fun and just yes . You know, accepting that this is, you know, this is what it's , it's not a, you know, it's not something that needs to prevent us from going out and just living our best life anyway.

Speaker 1:

And I see that in you all the time, you just live your life to the fullest and it's so inspiring and awesome to see, like you just, you have fun and enjoy yourself and be you, which is the best thing you can do. So it's really cool

Speaker 2:

To see , oh , thank you. Yeah. Oh, I've had good role models as well. And you know, I think that's, that's the other good thing, you know, look out for people like yourself, Belinda, who are , you know, who are really educating people around this space. Yeah . Because it still is a lot of unknowns around it. Like, you know, definitely.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Well, and I still learn, I'm constantly learning. It's just, yeah. It's one of those things, things change and evolve and we just need to keep up with it. So yeah, it is good to

Speaker 2:

Yeah .

Speaker 1:

To learn. And

Speaker 2:

So, yeah. So just, you know, linking with the people who know what they're talking about and yeah, listen.

Speaker 1:

Yep . Good tips. All right . And Hannah had a couple of questions as well. So she said, do you ever feel scared about eating out? Is that something that you feel, or you did share some tips on eating out, but do you feel, do you feel

Speaker 2:

Scared about it? Not, not now. I don't, but like before. Yep . You know, I , in that period of time where I didn't wanna tell people that I , and I dunno why we don't wanna tell people we've got CX disease , but you know , um, I'd avoid going out . Yeah . Like what would be the point? Cause I wouldn't know, but like I said, you know, do a bit of do a bit of your own research if you're really worried about a restaurant , um , don't be afraid to say, you know, no, that I , um , you know , I don't wanna go to that place cause it doesn't serve , you know , um , gluten free food. Yeah . But talk with the restaurant as well. Cause I know most, you know, I mean , I can't say I know most restaurants, but you know, a lot of restaurants will actually cater for you if they know .

Speaker 1:

Mm . I agree. Yeah . I think that people want your business, they want your money and they wanna look after you because it's their reputation at stake as well. So yeah. I , I, I personally don't want people to be fearful of eating out because it's part of life mm-hmm <affirmative> and it's part of socializing and enjoying being with friends and family. So I think it's a huge part of living with celiac disease to learn how to eat out. Definitely.

Speaker 2:

Mm , absolutely. And even the worst case scenario, if you go somewhere and you're not sure, I mean, you can, you know, you , you still need to talk to the , the restaurant, but you know, you can be generally pretty safe with, you know, some fresh veggies or, you know, fresh salad or, you know, like, but , but still ask, cuz you dunno , what's in the dressings. That's right . What they've cut up on the benches before and that sort of stuff, you know, if you're very, very , um , reactive to any type of gluten. Yeah, definitely .

Speaker 1:

And the other one was , um , an interesting question. I'm looking forward to your answer to this. So do you ever feel sad that you are missing out on any food ?

Speaker 2:

Not really , really out was pizza in the was , but you know, again, you can go to , you know , uh , you know , pizza places now and they have gluten free bases and you can put all the gluten free stuff on top .

Speaker 1:

Yeah .

Speaker 2:

It has improved . It's terrible.

Speaker 1:

Gluten free pizza now . It's good .

Speaker 2:

I know. And you know, I think also , um, so I think, yeah, things are improving. I think also, I don't know , Belinda , I do know that, you know, your beautiful , um , family are very supportive of knowing what you know with , with CX disease. And I think that's also important as well. Yes . Like there was a time I've gone off track with the question, but there was a time where , um, like we would cook, we , you know, Paul, my husband, so he would cook , um , he'd go, oh , here's your gluten free pasta . And we having a normal pasta cause like, he'd be like, oh , that gluten free pasta is absolutely disgusting. Yeah . But over time it has proved . And now yeah , that shot . It's like, you know, we have pasta, it's always gluten free . We have, you know, everything in our place is gluten free and everyone just has it now. Yes . So , you know , I think , um , definitely you can enjoy anything. I've got the mix and you know , there's gluten free recipes, Thermo mix . So anything you want , um , really these days you can have. Um , yeah . Um , and like I said, you know , I probably should need as many cakes and chips and all the gluten free things now, but yeah . I , you know, I don't think there's a reason that any of us should miss out on that's. Right. You know, it's

Speaker 1:

All about that food .

Speaker 2:

Yeah . Yeah. Right. Yeah . That's right. So yeah. Yeah .

Speaker 1:

Definitely balance. Does anyone else in your family have celiac disease? This is something I'd never ever asked your mom ?

Speaker 2:

No, not , well, I've got a nephew who, who , um , has . Okay . So , um , and he's, he was , he was diagnosed, well, first off I did the blood test cause you know, they like all new to me cuz I never had a blood test obviously back in the day. But um , and then he , he went through the, you know, going and seeing the specialist and having the gastro gastro thing done. Yeah . Um, but yeah , so he has, we thought my daughter might have had it, so Jess might have had it at some point. Um, but we got her tested and no, she, she wasn't OK . That , you know,

Speaker 1:

That's good.

Speaker 2:

It's sort of the first thing I talk to people about now, if they say that they're feeling sick for eating food, I just say, oh , you know , have you actually been tested <laugh> cause it could be a simple fix. Like , you know , that's might not need to feel like this and it could just be, and you know yes , sure . Go and eat some glutenin free food . See if you feel better, but then actually go and get yourself, do something better . Probably diagnosed . Yeah. Don't yeah .

Speaker 1:

Right . What has been your biggest challenge living with celiac disease? Do you think Lisa?

Speaker 2:

I think the biggest challenge , um , as we talked about is traveling. Okay . And you know, wanting to experience because for , you know, for me, food is so important in your traveling experience. Yes. And um, in particularly in Asian countries. Yeah . Um , like the food is divine, but a lot of it isn't gluten free even though they might be using rice flour and all those things. Yeah . It's still not entirely gluten free mm-hmm <affirmative> so I think that's for me is the traveling and, and um , wanting to experience foods from different cultures that, you know, I do tend , you know, you do miss out on . Yeah . So that's probably the worst thing about, for me for about having Celia disease . Yeah . Um , but you know , again , Google translator is okay ,

Speaker 1:

That's a good one.

Speaker 2:

You have to, there has to be a bit of trust. <laugh> sometimes in those street store , the rock store that I actually trust. Yeah . You know what, they're giving me just an exchange for my money, but yeah . Um, yeah, so it , it can be risky, but um, I still think even overseas, if you can , if you can find, you know, good restaurants, mm-hmm , <affirmative> that cater for , um, you know , um , tourists who come from, you know, who , who , who have a myriad of, you know, food allergies. So yeah.

Speaker 1:

And there's some fantastic , um , cards that you can use now, like equal eats. I don't know if you've heard of them. They do a fantastic,

Speaker 2:

I have not

Speaker 1:

Card , which you can order in many different countries , many different languages rather. And it explains on there that you have celiac disease, what you can and can't eat. And let's just say you were going to Bali, you'd get it printed in Indonesia. And then when you go out for a meal, you just give that to your server and you're well looked after there's none of that miscommunication. So they're

Speaker 2:

Oh , fantastic. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So worth looking into

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. I will because we're going to Vietnam in August. So , um , and I have been thinking a little bit about this, about how do I experience the beautiful Vietnamese food. Yes . Um , which, you know, a lot of it is gluten free , but again, it's the , the sources and the things that they put in with it that, you know, can cause some problems. So , um , but I will definitely , um , get myself some cards.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I went to

Speaker 2:

See how I go

Speaker 1:

Two years back , um, and had a wonderful experience. I , I used a translated card. Um , it wasn't an equal eat one cuz I hadn't heard of their brand back then, but I used a similar one and it was amazing. I just gave it every time I ordered a meal and I was so looked after cuz you know, you never wanna get sick when you're in another country. Yeah . And I was fine. I was so well looked after, even in the restaurant I stayed in, they baked me my own gluten free bread every morning.

Speaker 2:

Oh wow.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So that's amazing. Yeah . That is really, it's really good. Cause we cruise a lot as well. And now a lot of the cruise ships, you know, cater for gluten , they've got like their own gluten-free excellent area. You know, where , where all the gluten-free food is cooked there by itself. So yeah. Beautiful.

Speaker 1:

Oh , there you go. Mm-hmm that's a good one to know haven't done the cruise ship thing yet. <laugh>

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Well, well we'll get back into , we've got a cruise to P in your Guinea in um, November. So it's like everything's opened up again so you

Speaker 1:

Know , gotta go live again. Be

Speaker 2:

Good . <laugh> absolutely.

Speaker 1:

All right . Well we'll wrap it up shortly because I know you need to go, but um, I just had one more question. So what advice would you give to others that have a young one who has been diagnosed with celiac disease? Cuz I know a lot of moms reach out to me and say that they feel guilty and they have a lot of angst around it. So what, as someone that's lived with celiac disease since being very, very little, what advice would you give to those parents?

Speaker 2:

Um, well I can't, I mean, I'm not a parent of someone who has celiac disease, so , um, my, my response will be more around just, you know, it's no one's fault. Yeah. You know, it is what it is . Mm-hmm <affirmative> um, we do live in a time where there is an abundance of, you know, food , uh , for, you know, people who have CX disease. And I think just be understanding right . Just, you know, be , um, I guess be aware of , uh , what happens if your child does , um, eat gluten, you know, and talk to them about it, talk to the school. Yeah . Like again, you know, I I'm , I'm not a believer in, you know, I don't believe we should exclude cakes and whatever from schools because someone has analogy . I actually think it's important that we talk to schools and, you know, poor our teachers. They , we expect them to do so much, but you know what? They can , you know, if talk about it, you know , we had this, I can't remember what it is , but you know, we have celiac week, every year and when it is , um , you know , just talk about it and say it's okay . And if , you know , go someone's place , um , you know , talk to the parents, take your own snacks. Yeah . Make it normal, I guess it's just make it normal for keep it normal . You normal . Yeah . Yeah. They're no different. It's not about being different. It's about just, this is something that happens to yeah . A lot of, you know, people. Yeah. And it's normal

Speaker 1:

And making them included. Yeah . I love it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah . That's yeah. That's right . Yeah. Inclusion's important.

Speaker 1:

Definitely.

Speaker 2:

So yeah. Good

Speaker 1:

Tips. Fantastic. Well, thank you so much, Lisa. I really loved having

Speaker 2:

You . That's alright .

Speaker 1:

Chatting with you. Now, if my listeners wanna connect with you, where can they find you online that you're happy for them to follow you

Speaker 2:

Or reach out ? Well, you know, I'm on Facebook. Um, and um, Instagram. Yeah . I don't, you know, I don't talk a lot about my, you know, celiac disease and, and um, that journey mm-hmm <affirmative> but , um, it is an interesting thing that I probably should find myself talking more about. Yeah . But um , yeah . Facebook , Instagram. Yeah .

Speaker 1:

Beautiful .

Speaker 2:

Yeah . All the socials, all the socials

Speaker 1:

Butterfly that you well , thank you again . Fantastic. Well thank you again and yeah. Enjoy the rest of your weekend here in wet Adelaide. We'll talk

Speaker 2:

To you soon. I know. Wet and cold and windy. Thanks Belinda.

Speaker 1:

All right . Thanks so much. See you later.